Media

'Karamu: 100 Years in the House' is inspiring but rushed history lesson (review)

Karamu House graduate Vanessa Bell Calloway, who grew up in Cleveland, is among those interviewed for the documentary "Karamu: 100 Years in the House." (Bounce TV)


By Mark Dawidziak, The Plain Dealer
on February 11, 2017 at 11:00 AM, updated February 11, 2017 at 11:03 AM

CLEVELAND, Ohio – As a fast-paced summary of a Cleveland theatrical institution’s rich history, “Karamu: 100 Years in the House” succeeds admirably. It is heartfelt. It is often inspiring. And it certainly tells the tale in a lively, engaging and fascinating manner.

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Karamu House celebrates black history and looks ahead to the next 100 years

“We are a treasure and have many treasures,” said Tony Sias, President & CEO of the Karamu House.


A Staple in the community is now looking to switch gears.
NEWSNET5.COM | BY LAUREN WILSON

CLEVELAND – A staple in the community is now looking to switch gears.

When Jonathon L. Jackson walks on stage, he’s reminded of the greats that have come before him.

Actors and writers like Langston Hughes, Ruby Dee and Bill Cobbs have all passed through or gotten their start at the Karamu House on East 89th Street in Cleveland.

“We are a treasure and have many treasures,” said Tony Sias, President & CEO of the Karamu House.

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Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration at Karamu House

Several hundred attended a free event at Karamu House to honor Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday


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Dancers from the Cleveland School of the Arts perform during the Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration at Karamu House, Monday, January 16, 2017. (Marvin Fong / The Plain Dealer)

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Several hundred attended a free event at Karamu House to honor Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday, the day to honor the civil rights leader. Inspirational drama, dancers, speeches and singing kept the attention of the crowd.

REVIEW

Blues in the Night at Karamu Official Trailer

A dynamite, dramatic musical - Friday, September 9 to Sunday, October 2, 2016

This Tony-nominated compilation of 26 hot and torchy blues tunes is a musical commentary on three women’s relationships with one snake of a guy. The evening’s music is raunchily forthright and good-humored with classic blues ranging from Bessie Smith, Duke Ellington, Johnny Mercer, Alberta Hunter, Jimmy Cox, Ida Cox and more.

REVIEW